National Aboriginal Day

Logo from the Assembly of First Nations 32nd Annual General Assembly (AGA) The Spirit of Peace and Friendship

Logo from the Assembly of First Nations
32nd Annual General Assembly (AGA)
The Spirit of Peace and Friendship

Today marks National Aboriginal Day in Canada, originally proclaimed by the Governor General in 1996.   Though officialised by government, it was driven by a movement of First Nations, Métis and Inuit leaders for more than a decade previously.  The original call was for a day of solidarity – a day bringing together Nations and Peoples; celebrating and honouring Aboriginal People in Canada.  It coincides with the summer solstice, honoured for thousands of years by the First Peoples as an important change in the calendar that guided hunting and gathering practices.

Today we honour all those working to bring together Nations and people; to share and learn together and to work in genuine and meaningful partnership to build on communities strengths that will allow Nations to overcome overwhelming systemic challenges.

inuitflag

Flag of Nunavut, featuring a red inuksuk—an Inuit land marker—and a blue star, which represents the Niqirtsuituq, the North Star, and the leadership of elders in the community.

Three Things Consulting is proud to work alongside our First Nation and Aboriginal partners and today we acknowledge our Indigenous staff team and their contributions not simply to Three Things but to all children, youth and communities.  We are grateful for the opportunities to learn, share and work collaboratively to spread the message of the 3 Things…you matter, you are important and you belong.

Whether you are joining a rally on Parliament Hill today, as the Paddlers for Our Water make their way to Victoria Island, take part in local activities in your community or simple take time to learn more – today is a day

we can all stand in solidarity with First Nations, Métis and Inuit Peoples.  There is no surprise to us the number of activities and events being organized by young people and the role that youth play in celebrating culture and honouring the learnings from their Ancestors.

The Métis Flag, first used by Métis resistance fighters in Canada prior to the Battle of Seven Oaks in 1816.

The Métis Flag, first used by Métis resistance fighters in Canada prior to the Battle of Seven Oaks in 1816.

On Monday we are launching our new program LeaderSeed. As we enter this new season we want to support the planting of seeds of leadership amongst young people across Canada. We look forward to sharing this message with our Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal partners as we help a new generation of leaders grow.

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